Metrology

One can only make what one can measure, so metrology is an indispensable key enabler in any high precision fabrication process.

In the 3-days training “Metrology and calibration in mechatronic systems” trainer Rens Henselmans and his team covers the full complexity of metrology and calibration. Starting with simple hands-on exercises, essentials back-of-the-envelop-calculations and demonstrations up to the challenges (and lessons learned) of designing a 3D non-contact metrology system for large aspherical and freeform optics with nanometer measurement accuracy.

 

Calibration

Reproducibility is the starting requisite for any precision application. Once precision has been achieved, it is time for calibration in order to correct for systematic errors and achieve accuracy. Thinking about a calibration strategy including integrated sensors and reference objects is crucial already in the design phase of a machine, since it is not easily added afterwards. When designing an ultra-precision system, that aims to out-perform anything available on the market, calibration tools and reference objects of sufficient quality might even not be available and designers have to fall back on ingenious tricks like reversal techniques. Even better is to incorporate this technique in the design so that the machine can calibrate itself.

Would you like to dive into the subject of metrology and calibration on a detailed engineering level? Check out the 3-day hands-on training “Metrology and calibration in mechatronic systems”, given by experts in the field.

 

System accuracy

Designing systems with small uncertainty in position or dimension involves both complementary aspects, e.g. precision and accuracy, though the terms are often mixed-up in daily practice, says trainer Rens Henselmans during an interview.

It all starts with designing a system which is very repeatable and reproducible, resulting in good precision. Once that has been achieved, it is time for calibration in order to correct for systematic errors and achieve accuracy.

Reproducibility can only be achieved by proper machine design, applying well known design principles like for kinematic constraints or Abbe principles, combined with essential knowledge of motions systems, control and position sensors.

Thinking about a calibration strategy including integrated sensors and reference objects is crucial already in the design phase of a machine, since it is not easily added afterwards. When designing an ultra-accurate system, that aims to out-perform anything available on the market, calibration tools and reference objects of sufficient quality might even not be available and designers have to fall back on ingenious tricks like reversal techniques. Even better is to incorporate this technique in the design so that the machine can calibrate itself.